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Posts Tagged: sweat bee

When Irish Eyes Are Smiling...There Must Be a Green Insect Nearby

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When Irish eyes are smiling, it could be... St. Patrick's Day is approaching or A green insect is nearby  If you've ever seen the female metallic green sweat bee,...

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 15, 2019 at 7:18 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Wearing o' the Green

A close-up of a male green sweet bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a coneflower, Rudbeckia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On St. Patrick's Day, we see green. We crave green. We wear green. And the penalty for not wearing green? You get pinched. Not so with green sweat bees. As their common...

A close-up of a male green sweet bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a coneflower, Rudbeckia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A close-up of a male green sweet bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a coneflower, Rudbeckia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A close-up of a male green sweet bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a coneflower, Rudbeckia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2018 at 5:43 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Dragonfly vs. Bee: Catch of the Day

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her  prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) waits oh-so-patiently atop a bamboo stick at the edge of the pollinator garden. She's in Vacaville, Calif., and the...

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her  prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 4:34 PM

Going Native

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees aren't the only bees out foraging. We saw our first native bee of the season on Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. Native pollinator specialist...

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 6:15 PM

Bee All You Can Bee

Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to celebrate! The UC Davis Departmentof Entomology and Nematology has scheduled a fifth anniversary celebration of  its bee garden on Saturday, May 2. It's...

Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Several years after it was planted, the bee garden looked quite mature. This photo was taken May 22, 2012. This year it is five years old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 at 8:33 PM

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