San Bernardino County
University of California
San Bernardino County

Posts Tagged: spiders

Gotta Love Those Crab Spiders!

A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotta love those crab spiders! We've seen them ambushing prey, eating prey and looking for more prey. They're members of the Thomisidae family of spiders. They...

A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider nails a lygus bug, a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This green bottle fly met its fate, compliments of a crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This green bottle fly met its fate, compliments of a crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This green bottly fly met its fate, compliments of a crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider tucked inside a zinnia blossom awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider tucked inside a zinnia blossom awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider tucked inside a zinnia blossom awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 15, 2020 at 5:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Spider Alert! Meet a Little Charmer

Spider alert! Spider alert! Some folks request a "spider alert" because they cringe in horror when they see an image of the eight-legged critter. Even a little charmer like...


"Well, hello there!" A mature male crab spider, likely a Missumessus species (Thomisidae, crab spider) as identified by UC Davis Professor Jason Bond, peers at the camera from his Tithonia post. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Well, hello there!" A mature male crab spider, likely a Missumessus species (Thomisidae, crab spider) as identified by UC Davis Professor Jason Bond, peers at the camera from his Tithonia post. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Hey, I'll pose for a side view." A male crab spider scuttles around on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Hey, I'll pose for a side view." A male crab spider scuttles around on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Is this my best side?" The male crab spider strikes a "pose" for the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Is this my best side?" The male crab spider strikes a "pose" for the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Watch me, I shall do my vanishing act!" The crab spider moves out of the photographer's view. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Watch me, I shall do my vanishing act!" The crab spider moves out of the photographer's view. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 16, 2020 at 2:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

Name That Spider--And Did They Ever!

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

When UC Davis Professor Jason Bond  discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders in Monterey County and issued a call for folks to name the species, did they...

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)
This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)
This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

Posted on Friday, June 5, 2020 at 4:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Name That Spider!

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

Name that spider!  UC Davis professor Jason Bond is seeking a species name for a new genus of trapdoor spiders he discovered on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State...

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza.  (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)
UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at 4:42 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Searching the California Floristic Province for Trapdoor Spiders

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

A UC Davis scientist has just received a federal grant to study trapdoor spiders in California, with opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in the research....

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)
A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 at 6:01 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: jshartin@ucdavis.edu