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Posts Tagged: pollinators

Rebecca Irwin: Role of Floral Traits in Pollination and Bee Disease Transmission

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've seen honey bees buzzing past you to reach a good nectar or pollen source. But there's much more to it than that. What's in that floral nectar and pollen? Think...

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Dicks: The Importance of People in Pollinator Conservation

Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The global decline of pollinators ought to concern everybody, and everybody ought to get involved, said bee conservation researcher Lynn Dicks of the School of Biological...

Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Vince Jones (far right) of Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., addressing the crowd on
Vince Jones (far right) of Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., addressing the crowd on "Implementing a Honeybee Foraging Model and REDAPOLL Fruit Set Predictions in Washington State's Decision Aid System." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Vince Jones (far right) of Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., addressing the crowd on "Implementing a Honeybee Foraging Model and REDAPOLL Fruit Set Predictions in Washington State's Decision Aid System." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's break time in the ARC Ballroom, UC Davis, for the attendees at the International Pollinator Conference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's break time in the ARC Ballroom, UC Davis, for the attendees at the International Pollinator Conference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's break time in the ARC Ballroom, UC Davis, for the attendees at the International Pollinator Conference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A reception for the crowd at the International Pollinator Conference. The site: the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, Robert Mondavi Institute. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A reception for the crowd at the International Pollinator Conference. The site: the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, Robert Mondavi Institute. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A reception for the crowd at the International Pollinator Conference. The site: the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, Robert Mondavi Institute. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Discussing the conference are these members of the Neal Williams lab. From left pollination ecologist Neal Williams, professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Nick Rosenberger, Colin Fagan and Anna Britzman. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Discussing the conference are these members of the Neal Williams lab. From left pollination ecologist Neal Williams, professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Nick Rosenberger, Colin Fagan and Anna Britzman. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Discussing the conference are these members of the Neal Williams lab. From left pollination ecologist Neal Williams, professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Nick Rosenberger, Colin Fagan and Anna Britzman. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Keynote speaker Christina Grozinger (left), distinguished professor of entomology and director of the Center for Pollinator Research, Pennsylvania State University, with conference co-chair Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Grozinger served as Niño's major professor at Penn State. (Photo by Mea McNeil)
Keynote speaker Christina Grozinger (left), distinguished professor of entomology and director of the Center for Pollinator Research, Pennsylvania State University, with conference co-chair Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Grozinger served as Niño's major professor at Penn State. (Photo by Mea McNeil)

Keynote speaker Christina Grozinger (left), distinguished professor of entomology and director of the Center for Pollinator Research, Pennsylvania State University, with conference co-chair Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Grozinger served as Niño's major professor at Penn State. (Photo by Mea McNeil)

The organizers: From left are Elizabeth
The organizers: From left are Elizabeth "Liz" Luu, events manager, UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center; conference co-chairs Elina Lastro Niño and Neal Williams of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology; and Amina Harris, director, the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The organizers: From left are Elizabeth "Liz" Luu, events manager, UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center; conference co-chairs Elina Lastro Niño and Neal Williams of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology; and Amina Harris, director, the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Third Graders Learn About Pollinators

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

(June 17-23 is National Pollinator Week.) "How many species of bees are there in the world?" asks Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program...

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program shows the third graders how to use a bee vacuum in a catch-and-release activity.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program shows the third graders how to use a bee vacuum in a catch-and-release activity. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program shows the third graders how to use a bee vacuum in a catch-and-release activity. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I can see the bee! There it is! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I can see the bee! There it is! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I can see the bee! There it is! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What kind of butterfly is this? The answer: Monarch! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What kind of butterfly is this? The answer: Monarch! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What kind of butterfly is this? The answer: Monarch! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP), tells the students she hopes to see them study entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP), tells the students she hopes to see them study entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP), tells the students she hopes to see them study entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Julia Wentzel introduced the concept of
Volunteer Julia Wentzel introduced the concept of "pollinator specialists" and engaged the students in creating a "pollinator." They then transferred "pollen" to different shaped flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Julia Wentzel introduced the concept of "pollinator specialists" and engaged the students in creating a "pollinator." They then transferred "pollen" to different shaped flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Robin Lowry, who managed the “Planting for Pollinators” and “Be a Beekeeper” station, displays a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Volunteer Robin Lowry, who managed the “Planting for Pollinators” and “Be a Beekeeper” station, displays a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Robin Lowry, who managed the “Planting for Pollinators” and “Be a Beekeeper” station, displays a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Students placed
Students placed "pollinators" inside flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Students placed "pollinators" inside flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to take a photo! Don't say
Time to take a photo! Don't say "cheese!" Say "honey!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to take a photo! Don't say "cheese!" Say "honey!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Matthew Hoepfinger, staff research associate in the E. L. Niño lab,  presented the live bee demonstration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Matthew Hoepfinger, staff research associate in the E. L. Niño lab, presented the live bee demonstration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Matthew Hoepfinger, staff research associate in the E. L. Niño lab, presented the live bee demonstration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I'm a bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hey, I'm a bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I'm a bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little beekeeper shapes a heart. Students took turns trying on the beekeeper protective suits. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A little beekeeper shapes a heart. Students took turns trying on the beekeeper protective suits. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little beekeeper shapes a heart. Students took turns trying on the beekeeper protective suits. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Salivating Over Salvia? Premiere Plant Sale at UC Davis Arboretum on Saturday, April 6

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus  vosnesenskii, nectars on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires (Salvia farinacea x S. farinacea) at the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at the Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Salivating over salvia? You can see, salivate--and purchase--salvias and more at the spring premiere plant sale sponsored by the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden on...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus  vosnesenskii, nectars on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires (Salvia farinacea x S. farinacea) at the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at the Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectars on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires (Salvia farinacea x S. farinacea) at the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at the Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectars on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires (Salvia farinacea x S. farinacea) at the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at the Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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bugsquadcarpenterbee

Why Silver Digger Bees Are Like Gold

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Why silver digger bees are like gold... Remember those "long lost" silver digger bees found last week at the San Francisco Presidio? They hadn't been seen in large...

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)
Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males.  (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)
Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males. (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)

Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males. (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)

This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.
This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.

This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.

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