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Posts Tagged: monarch butterfly

Independence Day and a Monarch

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, eclosed today (July 3) and is drying its wings on Hot Lips salvia, Salvia microphylla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We call it the Fourth of July or Independence Day. Our 13 American colonies rose up against the monarch of Great Britain, King George III, and declared themselves free and...

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, eclosed today (July 3) and is drying its wings on Hot Lips salvia, Salvia microphylla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, eclosed today (July 3) and is drying its wings on Hot Lips salvia, Salvia microphylla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, eclosed today (July 3) and is drying its wings on Hot Lips salvia, Salvia microphylla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 3, 2020 at 5:14 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Portraits of a Monarch Just Stopping By

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Welcome, Danaus plexippus!  A monarch butterfly, the first of the year, fluttered through our family pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. last Sunday and hung...

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. on Sunday, May 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch lands on a mallow, Althaea officinalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose,
The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose, "Sparkle and Shine," related to the Julia Child rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch took a liking to a yellow rose, "Sparkle and Shine," related to the Julia Child rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a
The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a "rooster." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch touched down on a succulent, hens-and-chicks (when it blooms, it's known as a "rooster." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture)  for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture) for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch stayed on the ear of a cat (garden sculpture) for about five minutes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 25, 2020 at 3:03 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment

A Monarch Sighting in January? In Sacramento? Yes!

A monarch in flight in the summer of 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. This is the non-native tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

News flash: Monarch sighting in Sacramento! Butterfly guru Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, spotted a monarch in Sacramento on...

A monarch in flight in the summer of 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. This is the non-native tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch in flight in the summer of 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. This is the non-native tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch in flight in the summer of 2017 in Vacaville, Calif. This is the non-native tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 30, 2020 at 11:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Learn How to Raise Praying Mantids, Butterflies and Other Insects

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker  will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Ever wanted to raise praying mantids, butterflies, silkworm moths and other insects? Or arachnids such as tarantulas? Scientists at the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology...

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker  will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)
Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, November 8, 2019 at 6:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

The Butterfly and the Bird

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly fluttered into our pollinator garden in Vacaville yesterday and sipped nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) as a bird looked on. Well, sort of...

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 1, 2019 at 4:47 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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