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Posts Tagged: hungry

Leave Me Alone, Please--I'm Eating!

A monarch caterpillar feasting on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Leave me alone, please--I'm eating." The monarch caterpillar feasting on the tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif., kept doing what monarch...

A monarch caterpillar feasting on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar feasting on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar feasting on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar stretches out on a leaf, binge eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar stretches out on a leaf, binge eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar stretches out on a leaf, binge eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello there! But move along, please. Can't you see I'm eating? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Well, hello there! But move along, please. Can't you see I'm eating? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello there! But move along, please. Can't you see I'm eating? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The milkweed is always greener on the other side. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The milkweed is always greener on the other side. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The milkweed is always greener on the other side. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 2, 2020 at 3:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Yard & Garden

Those Amazing Ticks: And How Hungry Ticks Work Harder to Find You

Two Dermacentor occidentalis (Pacific Coast ticks)

They ticked me off. Ticks can do that to you. I never think about ticks during the holiday season, but a news release from the University of Cincinnati about how...

Two Dermacentor occidentalis (Pacific Coast ticks)
Two Dermacentor occidentalis (Pacific Coast ticks) "collected" during a Sonoma outing: male on the left and female on right, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. They are about the size of a sesame seed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two Dermacentor occidentalis (Pacific Coast ticks) "collected" during a Sonoma outing: male on the left and female on right, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. They are about the size of a sesame seed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 29, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Pest Management, Yard & Garden
 
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