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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden

Pollinia: Like Having Gum on Your Shoes

This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever stepped in sticky gum, it's similar to what happens when an insect steps into milkweed pollinia.  Take the wasps visiting the tropical milkweed...

This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This wasp, a species of Podalonia, flies off a tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden with a load of pollinia, a packet of sticky golden pollen grains. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Podalonia wasp nectars on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Podalonia wasp nectars on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Podalonia wasp nectars on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A wasp foraging upside down on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A wasp foraging upside down on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A wasp foraging upside down on tropical milkweed at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Off to another tropical milkweed--and off packing pollinia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Off to another tropical milkweed--and off packing pollinia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Off to another tropical milkweed--and off packing pollinia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the gold, wishboned-shaped  pollinia on the honey bee's feet as she heads for more showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Note the gold, wishboned-shaped pollinia on the honey bee's feet as she heads for more showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the gold, wishboned-shaped pollinia on the honey bee's feet as she heads for more showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 17, 2020 at 3:57 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Widow Skimmer Dragonfly: What a Treat to See

A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

She probably eats a lot of mosquitoes. After all, we just observed National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, June 21-27, didn't we? We spotted this female widow skimmer...

A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) rests in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of a female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of a female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of a female widow skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2020 at 4:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Tiger in Your Garden

A screen shot of the Tree of Life-UC Davis YouTube program with host Joel Ledford (left) of the UC Davis Department of Plant Biology and Jason Bond of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology.

The "Tiger King" has nothing on the Western Tiger Swallowtail. The colorful yellow and black butterfly, Papilio rutulus, reigns supreme. We saw this one last week at the...

A screen shot of the Tree of Life-UC Davis YouTube program with host Joel Ledford (left) of the UC Davis Department of Plant Biology and Jason Bond of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology.
A screen shot of the Tree of Life-UC Davis YouTube program with host Joel Ledford (left) of the UC Davis Department of Plant Biology and Jason Bond of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology.

The Western Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, foraging in the Ruth Storer Garden in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The majestic Western Tiger Swallowtail spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The majestic Western Tiger Swallowtail spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The majestic Western Tiger Swallowtail spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Another view of the majestic Western Tiger Swallowtail in the Ruth Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Another view of the majestic Western Tiger Swallowtail in the Ruth Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Another view of the majestic Western Tiger Swallowtail in the Ruth Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 18, 2020 at 5:23 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

We Have a Winner of the Robbin Thorp Memorial Bumble Bee Contest!

Photographer Allan Jones captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6 in UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden to win the Robbin Thorp Memorial Bumble Bee Contest.

We have a winner of the Robbin Thorp Memorial Bumble Bee Contest! Macro insect photographer extraordinaire Allan Jones captured an image of a female black-tailed bumble bee,...

Photographer Allan Jones captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6 in UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden to win the Robbin Thorp Memorial Bumble Bee Contest.
Photographer Allan Jones captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6 in UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden to win the Robbin Thorp Memorial Bumble Bee Contest.

Photographer Allan Jones captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6 in UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden to win the Robbin Thorp Memorial Bumble Bee Contest.

Allan Jones (left) photographs Robbin Thorp on May 22, 2012 in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a half-acre bee garden on Bee Biology Road operated by the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Allan Jones (left) photographs Robbin Thorp on May 22, 2012 in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a half-acre bee garden on Bee Biology Road operated by the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Allan Jones (left) photographs Robbin Thorp on May 22, 2012 in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a half-acre bee garden on Bee Biology Road operated by the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 6, 2020 at 4:23 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Yard & Garden

Hear That Buzz on the Red Hot Poker?

A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On the last few days of Year 2019, where do you find a foraging honey bee? Well, if the temperature soars to 50 or 55, you might see honey bees slip out of their hives and...

A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the pollen on the honey bee foraging on a red hot poker  (genus Kniphofia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Check out the pollen on the honey bee foraging on a red hot poker (genus Kniphofia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the pollen on the honey bee foraging on a red hot poker (genus Kniphofia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A clump of
A clump of "red hot poker" or "Christmas cheer" (genus Kniphofia) brings winter cheer to a Napa vineyard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A clump of "red hot poker" or "Christmas cheer" (genus Kniphofia) brings winter cheer to a Napa vineyard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 3:49 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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