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Posts Tagged: Stagmomantis limbata

Not a Good Day for a Bee

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gravid praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, crawls out of a patch of African blue basil, and begins checking out the honey bees. Decisions. Decisions. Dozens of...

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 2, 2020 at 1:35 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

How a Praying Mantis Seizes the Day

A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're a praying mantis, it's important to start the day out right by meditating, praying,  and  exercising.  Close your eyes and slow your breathing. Be...

A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Stagmomantis limbata nymph starts the day by hanging upside down: keeps the blood flowing and the heart pumping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Balance training? Turn parallel as if you're on the parallel bars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Balance training? Turn parallel as if you're on the parallel bars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Balance training? Turn parallel as if you're on the parallel bars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Stretching is a great way to kick-start your day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Stretching is a great way to kick-start your day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Stretching is a great way to kick-start your day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lunges are good to make sure your coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia and tarsa are flexible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lunges are good to make sure your coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia and tarsa are flexible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lunges are good to make sure your coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia and tarsa are flexible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Daily morning exercise completed. Now turn upright and you may see a bee coming your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Daily morning exercise completed. Now turn upright and you may see a bee coming your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Daily morning exercise completed. Now turn upright and you may see a bee coming your way. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 14, 2020 at 3:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Portraits of The Predator and the Prey

Occupied! A praying mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata occupies a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Heads will not roll.  The Hunger Games will not begin.  Preying does not always work.  It's Aug. 2, 2020 and a praying mantis decides to occupy a specially...

Occupied! A praying mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata occupies a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Occupied! A praying mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata occupies a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Occupied! A praying mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata occupies a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Double Occupancy: The praying mantis and honey bee share the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Double Occupancy: The praying mantis and honey bee share the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Double Occupancy: The praying mantis and honey bee share the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Stare: The praying mantis, a carnivore, stares at the honey bee, a vegetarian. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Stare: The praying mantis, a carnivore, stares at the honey bee, a vegetarian. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Stare: The praying mantis, a carnivore, stares at the honey bee, a vegetarian. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, Yours? The honey bee prepares to leave the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Oh, Yours? The honey bee prepares to leave the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, Yours? The honey bee prepares to leave the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lone Occupancy! The praying mantis again owns the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lone Occupancy! The praying mantis again owns the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lone Occupancy! The praying mantis again owns the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 4, 2020 at 5:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

What's for Dinner? Drama on a Sunflower Blossom

A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's for dinner? If you're a praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, perched on a sunflower, sometimes it can be a long wait. Breakfast fades into lunch,...

A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, snags what appears to be a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gotcha! The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, snags what appears to be a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, snags what appears to be a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis nymph,  Stagmomantis limbata, finishing dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, finishing dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, finishing dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2020 at 3:50 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Just Look, Don't Take?

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When we last left Ms. Mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata residing in our verbena patch, she was munching on a honey bee. A successful ambush stalker, she was. But not...

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Whoa, where did it go? It was in my sights and now it's gone." The praying mantis loses her prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Whoa, where did it go? It was in my sights and now it's gone." The praying mantis loses her prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 22, 2019 at 4:06 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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