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Posts Tagged: Scientific Reports

Deadly Citrus Greening Disease: A Better Lure for Asian Citrus Psyllids

UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and  Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.

If you like or grow citrus, you ought to be worried about the worldwide threat of the deadly citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing or HLB) caused by infected Asian...

UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and  Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.
UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.

UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.

Of Butterfly Patterns and Genetic Codes

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, on lantana in Vacaville, Calif. Now researchers at the University of Manitoba have identified the genetic code by which butterflies can assign color patterns to different parts of their wings during development. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Who knew? You've probably watched those colorful painted ladies (Vanessa cardui) fluttering about in your yard, but have you read the newly published research about...

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, on lantana in Vacaville, Calif. Now researchers at the University of Manitoba have identified the genetic code by which butterflies can assign color patterns to different parts of their wings during development. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, on lantana in Vacaville, Calif. Now researchers at the University of Manitoba have identified the genetic code by which butterflies can assign color patterns to different parts of their wings during development. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, on lantana in Vacaville, Calif. Now researchers at the University of Manitoba have identified the genetic code by which butterflies can assign color patterns to different parts of their wings during development. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on lantana in Vacaville, Calif.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on lantana in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on lantana in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The presence of a predator startles a painted lady, Vanessa cardui. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The presence of a predator startles a painted lady, Vanessa cardui. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The presence of a predator startles a painted lady, Vanessa cardui. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2017 at 5:00 PM

How to Have a Rice Day

This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important  because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)

Rice farmers in southeast Asia don't "have a rice day" when the dreaded brown planthopper is infesting their crops. The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, or BPH, is the...

This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important  because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)
This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)

This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)

Posted on Friday, May 5, 2017 at 11:00 AM

The Bad News About the Monarch Population

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Good news: The first day of spring. Bad news: The future of the Eastern, migratory population of the monarch butterflies. Research published today in Scientific Reports...

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a butterfly bush in Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly feeding on a lantana in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly feeding on a lantana in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly feeding on a lantana in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 21, 2016 at 6:00 PM
 
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