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Posts Tagged: Nature journal

The Butterfly and the Bird

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly fluttered into our pollinator garden in Vacaville yesterday and sipped nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) as a bird looked on. Well, sort of...

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 1, 2019 at 4:47 PM

Pollinator Habitat: Important Part of Solar Energy Study

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy should not only be used to benefit global sustainability, but to protect our global ecological systems, including climate, air quality, water and wildlife, says...

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

How to Have a Rice Day

This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important  because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)

Rice farmers in southeast Asia don't "have a rice day" when the dreaded brown planthopper is infesting their crops. The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, or BPH, is the...

This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important  because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)
This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)

This photo shows sesame and the grass, Leersia sayanuka, planted together along a rice field edge in China. Sesame is important because it provides pollen and nectar for the parasitoids. (Photo courtesy of Zhongzian Lu)

Posted on Friday, May 5, 2017 at 11:00 AM

Why They're Cautioning: 'Use Antimicrobials Wisely'

The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that

UC Davis evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues are on a mission. When the United Nations meets Sept. 21 in New York, they want the UN to reframe its action on...

The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that
The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that "can no longer be cured with many older antibiotics or medicines." (Photo by Anthony Cornel, UC Davis)

The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that "can no longer be cured with many older antibiotics or medicines." (Photo by Anthony Cornel, UC Davis)

Posted on Monday, September 19, 2016 at 4:00 PM

Global Burden of Dengue

Professor Thomas Scott, a worldwide expert on dengue, is pictured in Kenya.

Don't ever underestimate the threat of dengue. The mosquito-borne viral disease known as “breakbone fever,” is three times more prevalent than originally...

Professor Thomas Scott, a worldwide expert on dengue, is pictured in Kenya.
Professor Thomas Scott, a worldwide expert on dengue, is pictured in Kenya.

Professor Thomas Scott, a worldwide expert on dengue, is pictured in Kenya.

Global dengue risk. Areas in red indicate high risk for dengue occurrence while green areas indicate low risk. (Map courtesy of Jane Messina)
Global dengue risk. Areas in red indicate high risk for dengue occurrence while green areas indicate low risk. (Map courtesy of Jane Messina)

Global dengue risk. Areas in red indicate high risk for dengue occurrence while green areas indicate low risk. (Map courtesy of Jane Messina)

Posted on Monday, April 8, 2013 at 9:38 PM
Tags: Aedes aegypti (22), dengue (10), Nature journal (7), Thomas Scott (14)

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