San Bernardino County
University of California
San Bernardino County

Posts Tagged: Leslie Saul-Gershenz

Scientists Focusing on Insect Biodiversity and Insect Decline

Leslie Saul-Gershenz of UC Davis will speak on

If you're looking for a thought-provoking discussion on insect biodiversity and decline, mark your calendars. Chemical ecologist and conservation biologist Leslie...

Leslie Saul-Gershenz of UC Davis will speak on
Leslie Saul-Gershenz of UC Davis will speak on "Is Insect Biodiversity, Biomass and Abundance Declining?” at the Hillside Club's Fireside Lecture Series, Berkeley, on March 2.

Leslie Saul-Gershenz of UC Davis will speak on "Is Insect Biodiversity, Biomass and Abundance Declining?” at the Hillside Club's Fireside Lecture Series, Berkeley, on March 2.

Conservation biologist Norm Gershenz is the CEO of SaveNature.Org.
Conservation biologist Norm Gershenz is the CEO of SaveNature.Org.

Conservation biologist Norm Gershenz is the CEO of SaveNature.Org.

Those Incredible Digger Bees and Their Nest Parasites

Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you want to learn about digger bees and the exciting research that UC Davis evolutionary ecologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz is pursuing, check out the wall display at...

Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Leslie Saul-Gershenz (left) and curator Emma Cluff stand by their display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister bee larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister bee larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister bee larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Posted on Friday, December 27, 2019 at 10:41 PM

Bohart Museum: The Joy of Eating...Drum Roll...Insects

Make a meal out of mealworms? Danielle Wishon baked these mealworm cookies. Yes, they were good. (Photo by Danielle Wishon)

If you want to know what it's like to eat a bug—doesn't everybody?--ask an entomologist, a bug ambassador, or an entomophagist, one who eats insects. So we...

Make a meal out of mealworms? Danielle Wishon baked these mealworm cookies. Yes, they were good. (Photo by Danielle Wishon)
Make a meal out of mealworms? Danielle Wishon baked these mealworm cookies. Yes, they were good. (Photo by Danielle Wishon)

Make a meal out of mealworms? Danielle Wishon baked these mealworm cookies. Yes, they were good. (Photo by Danielle Wishon)

Crickets will be on the menu at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's open house. Visitors are invited to sample them. Crickets are the new shrimp, says Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Crickets will be on the menu at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's open house. Visitors are invited to sample them. Crickets are the new shrimp, says Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Crickets will be on the menu at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's open house. Visitors are invited to sample them. Crickets are the new shrimp, says Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Youths Experience the Joy of Insects

Future entomologists? A group of students in a Bay Area three-week insect class, taught by SaveNature.Org, poses for a photo.

Do you remember when insects first fascinated you or when you developed a love of insects? Odds are that the children who attend the SaveNature.Org insect-themed sessions in...

Future entomologists? A group of students in a Bay Area three-week insect class, taught by SaveNature.Org, poses for a photo.
Future entomologists? A group of students in a Bay Area three-week insect class, taught by SaveNature.Org, poses for a photo.

Future entomologists? A group of students in a Bay Area three-week insect class, taught by SaveNature.Org, poses for a photo.

Getting up close and personal with a stick insect, also known as a walking stick.
Getting up close and personal with a stick insect, also known as a walking stick.

Getting up close and personal with a stick insect, also known as a walking stick.

Pollinator Habitat: Important Part of Solar Energy Study

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy should not only be used to benefit global sustainability, but to protect our global ecological systems, including climate, air quality, water and wildlife, says...

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: jshartin@ucdavis.edu