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Posts Tagged: Agraulis vanillae

A Quiet Veterans' Day

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's Veterans' Day, and after paying tribute to the military veterans (my ancestors have fought in all of our nation's wars, dating back to the American Revolution--and my...

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars have nearly skeletonized their host plant, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars have nearly skeletonized their host plant, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars have nearly skeletonized their host plant, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Frillary caterpillar                   crawls along on a passionflower vine stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Frillary caterpillar crawls along on a passionflower vine stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Frillary caterpillar crawls along on a passionflower vine stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 11, 2019 at 4:03 PM

Yes, They're Still There

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are keeping busy on a Vacaville (Calif.) passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, they're still there. More today than yesterday. That's how it goes in the Magical World of Butterflies. The Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are keeping busy, and...

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are keeping busy on a Vacaville (Calif.) passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are keeping busy on a Vacaville (Calif.) passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are keeping busy on a Vacaville (Calif.) passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not one, not two, but three Gulf Fritillaries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Not one, not two, but three Gulf Fritillaries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not one, not two, but three Gulf Fritillaries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A twosome on a passionflower vine. The Bohart Museum of Entomology gets calls from people who say they've found a
A twosome on a passionflower vine. The Bohart Museum of Entomology gets calls from people who say they've found a "two-headed butterfly." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A twosome on a passionflower vine. The Bohart Museum of Entomology gets calls from people who say they've found a "two-headed butterfly." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The orangish-reddish Gulf Fritillaries are spectacular butterflies, with silver-spangled underwings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The orangish-reddish Gulf Fritillaries are spectacular butterflies, with silver-spangled underwings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The orangish-reddish Gulf Fritillaries are spectacular butterflies, with silver-spangled underwings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two Gulf Fritillaries unite, and soon, more eggs, more caterpillars, more chrysalids and mroe adults. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)
Two Gulf Fritillaries unite, and soon, more eggs, more caterpillars, more chrysalids and mroe adults. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

Two Gulf Fritillaries unite, and soon, more eggs, more caterpillars, more chrysalids and mroe adults. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

Posted on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 at 5:13 PM

Why Love Is Like a Butterfly

Two Gulf Fritillaries meet on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Love is like a butterfly A rare and gentle thing --Love Is Like a Butterfly, Dolly Parton When Dolly Parton penned her song, "Love Is Like a Butterfly," she probably wasn't...

Two Gulf Fritillaries meet on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two Gulf Fritillaries meet on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two Gulf Fritillaries meet on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillaries become one, or as the Bohart Museum of Entomology scientists hear often,
The Gulf Fritillaries become one, or as the Bohart Museum of Entomology scientists hear often, "this is a two-headed butterfly." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillaries become one, or as the Bohart Museum of Entomology scientists hear often, "this is a two-headed butterfly." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries on a Tithonia--ignorning the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries on a Tithonia--ignorning the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries on a Tithonia--ignorning the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In insect wedding photography, the angles are important. Gulf Fritillaries on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In insect wedding photography, the angles are important. Gulf Fritillaries on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In insect wedding photography, the angles are important. Gulf Fritillaries on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary: A Glorious Butterfly

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary dries its wings while a caterpillar crawls around looking for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's commonly called a "passion butterfly," but we call it a Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillaea) or Gulf Frit. Or "spectacular." A sure sign of autumn: A skeletonized...

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary dries its wings while a caterpillar crawls around looking for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary dries its wings while a caterpillar crawls around looking for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary dries its wings while a caterpillar crawls around looking for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows a Gulf Fritillary, a chrysalis, a caterpillar and a caterpillar J'ing, about to form a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image shows a Gulf Fritillary, a chrysalis, a caterpillar and a caterpillar J'ing, about to form a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows a Gulf Fritillary, a chrysalis, a caterpillar and a caterpillar J'ing, about to form a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The silver-spangled underwings of the Gulf Fritllary--in sharp contrast to the orange-reddish wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The silver-spangled underwings of the Gulf Fritllary--in sharp contrast to the orange-reddish wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The silver-spangled underwings of the Gulf Fritllary--in sharp contrast to the orange-reddish wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello, there! Another Gulf Fritillary arrives on the scene. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Well, hello, there! Another Gulf Fritillary arrives on the scene. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello, there! Another Gulf Fritillary arrives on the scene. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 5:00 PM

Where Are You, Gulf Fritillaries?

A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Where are you, Gulf Fritillaries? The Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) population seems to be diminishing this year around Solano and Yolo counties. A few here, a few...

A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary shares a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) with a hover fly (Syrphid). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying an egg on the tendril of a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary laying an egg on the tendril of a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying an egg on the tendril of a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up shot of a Gulf Fritillary egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up shot of a Gulf Fritillary egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up shot of a Gulf Fritillary egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A very hungry Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A very hungry Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A very hungry Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary and its chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary and its chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary and its chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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