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Take a Virtual Tour of the California Dogface Butterfly Habitat

This is a screen shot from the Placer Land Trust (PLT) video on the California state insect. Bohart Museum associate and PLT guide Greg Kareofelas had just netted the butterfly in a display-and-release activity.

Ever seen the California state insect, the dogface butterfly (Zerene eurydice), or toured its celebrated habitat near Auburn on...

This is a screen shot from the Placer Land Trust (PLT) video on the California state insect. Bohart Museum associate and PLT guide Greg Kareofelas had just netted the butterfly in a display-and-release activity.
This is a screen shot from the Placer Land Trust (PLT) video on the California state insect. Bohart Museum associate and PLT guide Greg Kareofelas had just netted the butterfly in a display-and-release activity.

This is a screen shot from the Placer Land Trust (PLT) video on the California state insect. Bohart Museum associate and PLT guide Greg Kareofelas had just netted the butterfly in a display-and-release activity.

This is the egg of the California dogface butterfly, Zerene eurydice. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
This is the egg of the California dogface butterfly, Zerene eurydice. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

This is the egg of the California dogface butterfly, Zerene eurydice. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

This is the chrysalis of the California dogface butterfly reared by naturalist Greg Kareofelas of Davis. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
This is the chrysalis of the California dogface butterfly reared by naturalist Greg Kareofelas of Davis. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

This is the chrysalis of the California dogface butterfly reared by naturalist Greg Kareofelas of Davis. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

An adult California dogface butterfly reared by Greg Kareofelas. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
An adult California dogface butterfly reared by Greg Kareofelas. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

An adult California dogface butterfly reared by Greg Kareofelas. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Posted on Thursday, August 13, 2020 at 4:34 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Emily Bick: Salinity, the Water Hyacinth and a Weevil

This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.

If that heavy growth of water hyacinth in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in central California alarms you, then you'll want to read a newly published research paper...

This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.
This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.

This is the giant water bath created from a leftover evaporative cooler from the Michael Parrella lab.

The water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, is an invasive weed but has an attractive flower. (Photo by Wouter Hagens, Wikipedia)
The water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, is an invasive weed but has an attractive flower. (Photo by Wouter Hagens, Wikipedia)

The water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, is an invasive weed but has an attractive flower. (Photo by Wouter Hagens, Wikipedia)

Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 at 5:54 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

A Monarch Is Like a Stained Glass Window

A monarch butterfly, looking like a stained glass window, rises from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, on Aug. 7 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever seen a back-lit monarch butterfly? It's like a stained-glass window in a centuries-old steepled church where you cannot see the ugliness of the world, but its...

A monarch butterfly, looking like a stained glass window, rises from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, on Aug. 7 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly, looking like a stained glass window, rises from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, on Aug. 7 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, looking like a stained glass window, rises from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, on Aug. 7 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away. The monarch rises from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, on Aug. 7 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up, up and away. The monarch rises from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, on Aug. 7 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away. The monarch rises from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, on Aug. 7 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 at 4:10 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Joy of Rearing Monarchs

This is a close-up of a monarch egg, taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. It is about the size of a pinhead. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch butterfly egg is oh-so-very-tiny but what an incredible work of nature! The intricate egg is about the size of a pinhead, 0.9mm wide and 1.2mm high. It's...

This is a close-up of a monarch egg, taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. It is about the size of a pinhead. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is a close-up of a monarch egg, taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. It is about the size of a pinhead. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a close-up of a monarch egg, taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. It is about the size of a pinhead. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three monarch eggs, one on each milkweed leaf (tropical milkweed Asclepias curassavica). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Three monarch eggs, one on each milkweed leaf (tropical milkweed Asclepias curassavica). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three monarch eggs, one on each milkweed leaf (tropical milkweed Asclepias curassavica). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the small container that the Garvey family uses to rear monarch eggs. It is about 2 inches wide. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the small container that the Garvey family uses to rear monarch eggs. It is about 2 inches wide. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the small container that the Garvey family uses to rear monarch eggs. It is about 2 inches wide. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Be aware that if you collect a monarch caterpillar or chrysalis, it may already be parasitized. It is better to start with the egg, says Bohart Museum of Entomology associate Greg Kareofelas. Note the tachinid-infested chrysalis (brown spot). This image, taken in July 2020, shows two chrysalids and three newly eclosed monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Be aware that if you collect a monarch caterpillar or chrysalis, it may already be parasitized. It is better to start with the egg, says Bohart Museum of Entomology associate Greg Kareofelas. Note the tachinid-infested chrysalis (brown spot). This image, taken in July 2020, shows two chrysalids and three newly eclosed monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Be aware that if you collect a monarch caterpillar or chrysalis, it may already be parasitized. It is better to start with the egg, says Bohart Museum of Entomology associate Greg Kareofelas. Note the tachinid-infested chrysalis (brown spot). This image, taken in July 2020, shows two chrysalids and three newly eclosed monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is part of the Greg Kareofelas setup to rear butterflies. He rears many species. Note the packing foam and chrysalis (not a monarch). (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
This is part of the Greg Kareofelas setup to rear butterflies. He rears many species. Note the packing foam and chrysalis (not a monarch). (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

This is part of the Greg Kareofelas setup to rear butterflies. He rears many species. Note the packing foam and chrysalis (not a monarch). (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Posted on Monday, August 10, 2020 at 2:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Congrats, Brendon Boudinot, Recipient of ESA's Snodgrass Memorial Research Award

Ant specialist Brendon Boudinot searching for ants at the Southwest Research Station in Chiricahua Mountains near Portal, Arizona. (Photo by Roberto Keller, National Museum of Natural History and Science, Portugal)

Congratulations to UC Davis alumnus and ant morphologist Brendon Boudinot recipient of the coveted Robert E. Snodgrass Memorial Research...

Ant specialist Brendon Boudinot searching for ants at the Southwest Research Station in Chiricahua Mountains near Portal, Arizona. (Photo by Roberto Keller, National Museum of Natural History and Science, Portugal)
Ant specialist Brendon Boudinot searching for ants at the Southwest Research Station in Chiricahua Mountains near Portal, Arizona. (Photo by Roberto Keller, National Museum of Natural History and Science, Portugal)

Ant specialist Brendon Boudinot searching for ants at the Southwest Research Station in Chiricahua Mountains near Portal, Arizona. (Photo by Roberto Keller, National Museum of Natural History and Science, Portugal)

Posted on Friday, August 7, 2020 at 3:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

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