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Pieris rapae, Pieris rapae, Pieris rapae...

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Today dawned foggy," began Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, in a Jan. 22nd group email. As you know, Shapiro sponsors the annual Cabbage White...

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Troubling Question: Why Are the Monarchs Declining in the West?

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The question is troubling: What's going on with the monarch butterfly population in the West? The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation reported this week that its...

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Why These Rock Artists Are Rock Stars

These rocks at the Bohart Museum of Entomology depict favorite insects: honey bees and ladybugs (lady beetles.) The larger rock, inspired by Valentine's Day, is titled

Rock artists, all. Those who painted rocks at the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Saturday, Jan. 18 were not just rock artists. They were rock stars,...

These rocks at the Bohart Museum of Entomology depict favorite insects: honey bees and ladybugs (lady beetles.) The larger rock, inspired by Valentine's Day, is titled
These rocks at the Bohart Museum of Entomology depict favorite insects: honey bees and ladybugs (lady beetles.) The larger rock, inspired by Valentine's Day, is titled "Love Bugs." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These rocks at the Bohart Museum of Entomology depict favorite insects: honey bees and ladybugs (lady beetles.) The larger rock, inspired by Valentine's Day, is titled "Love Bugs." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Youngsters flocked to the rock painting table at the Bohart Museum of Entomology to create their masterpieces. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Youngsters flocked to the rock painting table at the Bohart Museum of Entomology to create their masterpieces. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Youngsters flocked to the rock painting table at the Bohart Museum of Entomology to create their masterpieces. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some of the rocks painted during the Bohart Museum of Entomology's open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Some of the rocks painted during the Bohart Museum of Entomology's open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some of the rocks painted during the Bohart Museum of Entomology's open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This creative rock shows a butterfly framed in purple and white. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This creative rock shows a butterfly framed in purple and white. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This creative rock shows a butterfly framed in purple and white. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Every butterfly needs a rainbow and every rainbow needs a butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Every butterfly needs a rainbow and every rainbow needs a butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Every butterfly needs a rainbow and every rainbow needs a butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 22, 2020 at 2:56 PM

'Eyes on the Butterflies' at the Bohart Museum of Entomology

Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield, displays her blue butterfly cape, as Bohart associate Greg Karofelas holds a collection of blue morpho butterflies. In back is Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield knew just what to do. She donned her special outfit, a blue butterfly cape, and headed over to the open house at the Bohart Museum of...

Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield, displays her blue butterfly cape, as Bohart associate Greg Karofelas holds a collection of blue morpho butterflies. In back is Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield, displays her blue butterfly cape, as Bohart associate Greg Karofelas holds a collection of blue morpho butterflies. In back is Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield, displays her blue butterfly cape, as Bohart associate Greg Karofelas holds a collection of blue morpho butterflies. In back is Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield, wearing her blue butterfly cape, looks at the blue morpho butterflies held by Bohart associate Greg Karofelas. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield, wearing her blue butterfly cape, looks at the blue morpho butterflies held by Bohart associate Greg Karofelas. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tien Ferreira, 4, of Fairfield, wearing her blue butterfly cape, looks at the blue morpho butterflies held by Bohart associate Greg Karofelas. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brownie Girl Scout Troop 5520 members Lauren Wells (front),7, and Madeline Louis, 8, both of West Sacramento, look at a drawer of  butterflies held by Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Brownie Girl Scout Troop 5520 members Lauren Wells (front),7, and Madeline Louis, 8, both of West Sacramento, look at a drawer of butterflies held by Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brownie Girl Scout Troop 5520 members Lauren Wells (front),7, and Madeline Louis, 8, both of West Sacramento, look at a drawer of butterflies held by Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Before Brownie Girl Scout Troop 5520 toured the Bohart Museum, they met to discuss their insect-themed assignments. Here Lauren Wells (left), 7, and Madeline Louis, 8, display a handwritten poster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Before Brownie Girl Scout Troop 5520 toured the Bohart Museum, they met to discuss their insect-themed assignments. Here Lauren Wells (left), 7, and Madeline Louis, 8, display a handwritten poster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Before Brownie Girl Scout Troop 5520 toured the Bohart Museum, they met to discuss their insect-themed assignments. Here Lauren Wells (left), 7, and Madeline Louis, 8, display a handwritten poster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Savanna Miller, 7, and her sister Olivia, 4, of Vacaville, are fascinated by the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. These include Birdwing butterflies (left), and the yellow ones are the Tithonus Birdwing – Ornithoptera tithonus – from New Guinea and nearby island of Irian Jaya, according to curator Jeff Smith.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Savanna Miller, 7, and her sister Olivia, 4, of Vacaville, are fascinated by the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. These include Birdwing butterflies (left), and the yellow ones are the Tithonus Birdwing – Ornithoptera tithonus – from New Guinea and nearby island of Irian Jaya, according to curator Jeff Smith.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Savanna Miller, 7, and her sister Olivia, 4, of Vacaville, are fascinated by the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. These include Birdwing butterflies (left), and the yellow ones are the Tithonus Birdwing – Ornithoptera tithonus – from New Guinea and nearby island of Irian Jaya, according to curator Jeff Smith.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olivia Miller, 4, of Vacaville, is in awe. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Olivia Miller, 4, of Vacaville, is in awe. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olivia Miller, 4, of Vacaville, is in awe. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera section of the Bohart Museum, shows some specimens to Vacaville residents Ginny Miller and her grandchildren, Savanna, 7, and Olivia, 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera section of the Bohart Museum, shows some specimens to Vacaville residents Ginny Miller and her grandchildren, Savanna, 7, and Olivia, 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera section of the Bohart Museum, shows some specimens to Vacaville residents Ginny Miller and her grandchildren, Savanna, 7, and Olivia, 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olivia Miller, 4, and her sister, Savannah, 7, demonstrate how butterflies fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Olivia Miller, 4, and her sister, Savannah, 7, demonstrate how butterflies fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olivia Miller, 4, and her sister, Savannah, 7, demonstrate how butterflies fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Lepidoptera section of the Bohart Museum houses nearly half-a-million butterflies and moths. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Lepidoptera section of the Bohart Museum houses nearly half-a-million butterflies and moths. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Lepidoptera section of the Bohart Museum houses nearly half-a-million butterflies and moths. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2020 at 3:36 PM

Bohart Museum Open House: A Science of a Day

Doctoral student Ann Holmes holds up a bat specimen. Next to her is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a "Science of a Day" at the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology open house last Saturday afternoon, Jan. 18. For three hours, six UC Davis doctoral students...

Doctoral student Ann Holmes holds up a bat specimen. Next to her is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student Ann Holmes holds up a bat specimen. Next to her is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Ann Holmes holds up a bat specimen. Next to her is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors flock around doctoral student Ann Holmes to see the bat specimens and ask questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Visitors flock around doctoral student Ann Holmes to see the bat specimens and ask questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors flock around doctoral student Ann Holmes to see the bat specimens and ask questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist and doctoral student Alexander Dedmon awaits visitors. Behind him is a portrait of Professor Richard Bohart (1913-2007), founder of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forensic entomologist and doctoral student Alexander Dedmon awaits visitors. Behind him is a portrait of Professor Richard Bohart (1913-2007), founder of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist and doctoral student Alexander Dedmon awaits visitors. Behind him is a portrait of Professor Richard Bohart (1913-2007), founder of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon answers questions about  the many different ways insects can be used as evidence in forensic entomology.
Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon answers questions about the many different ways insects can be used as evidence in forensic entomology.

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon answers questions about the many different ways insects can be used as evidence in forensic entomology.

Doctoral student Charlotte Alberts explains her research on assassin flies, also known as robber flies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student Charlotte Alberts explains her research on assassin flies, also known as robber flies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Charlotte Alberts explains her research on assassin flies, also known as robber flies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors learned from doctoral student Charlotte Alberts how assassin flies catch their prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Visitors learned from doctoral student Charlotte Alberts how assassin flies catch their prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors learned from doctoral student Charlotte Alberts how assassin flies catch their prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologists and doctoral students Gabe Foote (left) and Crystal Homicz (right) talk about their research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologists and doctoral students Gabe Foote (left) and Crystal Homicz (right) talk about their research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologists and doctoral students Gabe Foote (left) and Crystal Homicz (right) talk about their research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz shows visitors evidence of damage by forest beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz shows visitors evidence of damage by forest beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz shows visitors evidence of damage by forest beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Yao Cai (center) led the discussion on circadian clocks and insects. With him are Nitrol Liu (left), also a graduate student in the Chiu lab, and Ben Kunimoto, a Davis Senior High School student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student Yao Cai (center) led the discussion on circadian clocks and insects. With him are Nitrol Liu (left), also a graduate student in the Chiu lab, and Ben Kunimoto, a Davis Senior High School student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Yao Cai (center) led the discussion on circadian clocks and insects. With him are Nitrol Liu (left), also a graduate student in the Chiu lab, and Ben Kunimoto, a Davis Senior High School student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Graduate student Nitrol Liu of the Joanna Chiu lab shows a fruit fly poster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Graduate student Nitrol Liu of the Joanna Chiu lab shows a fruit fly poster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Graduate student Nitrol Liu of the Joanna Chiu lab shows a fruit fly poster. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Zachary Griebenow greets visitors eager to learn about ants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student Zachary Griebenow greets visitors eager to learn about ants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Zachary Griebenow greets visitors eager to learn about ants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Zachary Griebenow talks about his specialty, ants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student Zachary Griebenow talks about his specialty, ants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Zachary Griebenow talks about his specialty, ants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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