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All Hail the Honey Bee

A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All hail the honey bee! It's an immigrant, like almost all of us, except for the Native Americans. European colonists brought the honey bee (Apis mellifera) to what is now...

A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, her head and antenna covered with mustard pollen, heads for more pollen in a bed of mustard in Vacavilel, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like a race horse, this bee seems to be bolting toward the finish line, a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Like a race horse, this bee seems to be bolting toward the finish line, a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like a race horse, this bee seems to be bolting toward the finish line, a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thar's gold in them thar hills--and gold pollen on her head, antennae, and thorax, not to mention the balls of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Thar's gold in them thar hills--and gold pollen on her head, antennae, and thorax, not to mention the balls of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thar's gold in them thar hills--and gold pollen on her head, antennae, and thorax, not to mention the balls of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 5:44 PM
Tags: Apis mellifera (23), honey bee (199), immigrant (1), mustard (15)

Ever Seen a Coronavirus-Equipped Mantis?

This is the coronavirus-equipped  mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

Sometimes you just have to display your sense of humor. Take the case of a huge praying mantis sculpture that anchors the Davis, Calif., front yard of entomologists Robert...

This is the coronavirus-equipped  mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)
This is the coronavirus-equipped mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

This is the coronavirus-equipped mantis that's drawing lots of smiles in the Davis front yard of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of UC Davis. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, watches a honey bee buzz her head in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden, Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, watches a honey bee buzz her head in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden, Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, watches a honey bee buzz her head in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden, Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever Seen a Plume Moth?

A pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) in Vacaville, Calif. on April 2, 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a plume moth? Or has a plume moth ever seen you? We spotted a pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) yesterday on our back door in Vacaville,...

A pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) in Vacaville, Calif. on April 2, 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) in Vacaville, Calif. on April 2, 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) in Vacaville, Calif. on April 2, 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey Bees Just Lovin' the Mustard

Packing a heavy load of pollen, a honey bee heads for a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The things we overlook are the things we should look for. Take mustard and honey bees. You've seen mustard thriving in fields, but have you ever considered planting some...

Packing a heavy load of pollen, a honey bee heads for a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Packing a heavy load of pollen, a honey bee heads for a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Packing a heavy load of pollen, a honey bee heads for a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Touchdown! A honey bee reaches a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Touchdown! A honey bee reaches a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Touchdown! A honey bee reaches a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee on top of her world--a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee on top of her world--a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee on top of her world--a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Heading home--a honey bee leaves a mustard patch to share her bounty with her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Heading home--a honey bee leaves a mustard patch to share her bounty with her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Heading home--a honey bee leaves a mustard patch to share her bounty with her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis Entomology/Nematology Seminars: What a Wealth of Information

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires in Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So, you're sheltering in place and thinking about honey bees, bumble bees, monarchs and assorted other insects.  Nematodes, too. And maybe a spider or two? You're in...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires in Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires in Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a spiked floral purple plant, Salvia indigo spires in Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black widow spider with two egg sacs. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black widow spider with two egg sacs. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black widow spider with two egg sacs. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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