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They Met the Mantids--and Scores of Other Critters

A tropical praying mantis, Choeradodis stalii: camouflaged. Lohit Garikipati displayed five of his female praying mantids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They met the mantids, walking sticks, beetle-mimicking roaches, Madagascar hissing cockroaches, tarantulas, silkworm moths, a butterfly, a dozen caterpillars and a...

A tropical praying mantis, Choeradodis stalii: camouflaged. Lohit Garikipati displayed five of his female praying mantids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tropical praying mantis, Choeradodis stalii: camouflaged. Lohit Garikipati displayed five of his female praying mantids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tropical praying mantis, Choeradodis stalii: camouflaged. Lohit Garikipati displayed five of his female praying mantids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Middle school students from the Elk Grove Unified School District talk to praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati, a UC Davis alumnus who rears mantids. In back is Bohart associate Emma Cluff. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Middle school students from the Elk Grove Unified School District talk to praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati, a UC Davis alumnus who rears mantids. In back is Bohart associate Emma Cluff. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Middle school students from the Elk Grove Unified School District talk to praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati, a UC Davis alumnus who rears mantids. In back is Bohart associate Emma Cluff. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student and Bohart associate Ziad Khouri talks to visitors about tarantulas and millipedes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student and Bohart associate Ziad Khouri talks to visitors about tarantulas and millipedes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student and Bohart associate Ziad Khouri talks to visitors about tarantulas and millipedes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas explains the moth and butterfly collection to a group of Elk Grove middle students. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas explains the moth and butterfly collection to a group of Elk Grove middle students. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas explains the moth and butterfly collection to a group of Elk Grove middle students. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomology alumnus Nicole Tam talks about her beetle-mimicking roaches. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomology alumnus Nicole Tam talks about her beetle-mimicking roaches. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomology alumnus Nicole Tam talks about her beetle-mimicking roaches. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomology student Ian Clark staffs the family crafts activity, which involved decorating silkworm cocoons for finger puppets. In back are silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker and UC Davis entomology student Andrew Goffinet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomology student Ian Clark staffs the family crafts activity, which involved decorating silkworm cocoons for finger puppets. In back are silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker and UC Davis entomology student Andrew Goffinet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomology student Ian Clark staffs the family crafts activity, which involved decorating silkworm cocoons for finger puppets. In back are silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker and UC Davis entomology student Andrew Goffinet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomology student Ben Maples shows a Madagascar hissing cockroach. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Gavey)
Entomology student Ben Maples shows a Madagascar hissing cockroach. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Gavey)

Entomology student Ben Maples shows a Madagascar hissing cockroach. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Gavey)

A Bohart Museum of Entomolgoy visitor gets acquainted with an Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Bohart Museum of Entomolgoy visitor gets acquainted with an Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Bohart Museum of Entomolgoy visitor gets acquainted with an Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepitoptera section, awaits visitors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepitoptera section, awaits visitors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepitoptera section, awaits visitors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Ann Kao, a 2019 UC Davis graduate who now works at the California Department of Food and Agriculture, crafts insect jewelry. At right is one of the t-shirts from the gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Ann Kao, a 2019 UC Davis graduate who now works at the California Department of Food and Agriculture, crafts insect jewelry. At right is one of the t-shirts from the gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Ann Kao, a 2019 UC Davis graduate who now works at the California Department of Food and Agriculture, crafts insect jewelry. At right is one of the t-shirts from the gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Silkworm Moths Draw Widespread Interest at Bohart Museum of Entomology Open House

Silkworm moth expert, İsmail Şeker, a Turkish medical doctor and author of a silkworm moth book, answers questions from the crowd at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Interest in silkworm moths soared high at the recent UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on “Arthropod Husbandry: Raising Insects for Research and...

Silkworm moth expert, İsmail Şeker, a Turkish medical doctor and author of a silkworm moth book, answers questions from the crowd at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Silkworm moth expert, İsmail Şeker, a Turkish medical doctor and author of a silkworm moth book, answers questions from the crowd at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Silkworm moth expert, İsmail Şeker, a Turkish medical doctor and author of a silkworm moth book, answers questions from the crowd at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The adult silkmoth cannot fly, İsmail Şeker tells the Bohart Museum of Entomology visitors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The adult silkmoth cannot fly, İsmail Şeker tells the Bohart Museum of Entomology visitors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The adult silkmoth cannot fly, İsmail Şeker tells the Bohart Museum of Entomology visitors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

İsmail Şeker with his book containing his macrophotographs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
İsmail Şeker with his book containing his macrophotographs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

İsmail Şeker with his book containing his macrophotographs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The silkworm moth display included eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The silkworm moth display included eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The silkworm moth display included eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cora Tatum, 3, of Davis, checks out her newly created finger puppet--a silkworm cocoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cora Tatum, 3, of Davis, checks out her newly created finger puppet--a silkworm cocoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cora Tatum, 3, of Davis, checks out her newly created finger puppet--a silkworm cocoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nobody Said Mother Nature Is Perfect

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly that never eclosed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some people are born good-looking. Some have the gift of gab. And some are lucky enough to be born smarter than the rest of us. Whether we like it or not, Mother Nature does...

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly that never eclosed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary butterfly that never eclosed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly that never eclosed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, one of Mother Nature's perfect specimens, covers a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, one of Mother Nature's perfect specimens, covers a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, one of Mother Nature's perfect specimens, covers a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, December 4, 2019 at 7:20 PM

A Good Day on the UC Davis Campus

Culex quinquefasciatus, the Southern house mosquito, one of the insects that Walter Leal studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Today was a good day on the University of California, Davis, campus. The National Academy of Inventors announced that two of our faculty members are fellows: Walter Leal,...

Culex quinquefasciatus, the Southern house mosquito, one of the insects that Walter Leal studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Culex quinquefasciatus, the Southern house mosquito, one of the insects that Walter Leal studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Culex quinquefasciatus, the Southern house mosquito, one of the insects that Walter Leal studies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jackson Audley: Targeting the Walnut Twig Beetle

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In  association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as

Doctoral candidate and forest entomologist Jackson Audley of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, targets an invasive bark beetle that's about the size of a...

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In  association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as
The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as "thousand cankers disease." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with the fungus, Geosmithia morbida, it causes the insect-pathogen complex known as "thousand cankers disease." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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