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Posts Tagged: Honey

The Beauty of the Bee

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla

Have you ever pulled up a chair in your garden and watched honey bees foraging? They are so intent on their "bees-ness" that they don't know you're there.  It's a great...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 4:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Show Me the Honey: Two UC Davis Events

Honey is the soul of a field of flowers. This image was taken at April 2017 in a field on Bee Biology Road, University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey is the soul of a field of flowers. It's also been called "the nectar of the gods." "The bee hive is the ultimate home sweet home," says Amina Harris, director of...

Honey is the soul of a field of flowers. This image was taken at April 2017 in a field on Bee Biology Road, University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey is the soul of a field of flowers. This image was taken at April 2017 in a field on Bee Biology Road, University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey is the soul of a field of flowers. This image was taken at April 2017 in a field on Bee Biology Road, University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee on a honeycomb at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Center, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee on a honeycomb at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Center, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee on a honeycomb at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Center, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 25, 2020 at 4:27 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Clay's Bees: The Bees, They're Gone

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

The bees, they're gone. Beekeeper Clay Ford, who owns the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as "Clay's Bees," is devastated. The fast-moving Vacaville Fire,...

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)
Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)
Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)
These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)

These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)

These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 24, 2020 at 4:09 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Yard & Garden

Honey Bees: Are There Pollen Specialists and Nectar Specialists?

A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You often hear that foraging honey bees are either pollen specialists or nectar specialists. That is, some leave the hive to collect pollen for their colony, and some to...

A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 18, 2020 at 10:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Milkweed: A Honey Bee's Floral Trap

A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is  the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It is not a "pretty sight," as Ernest Hemingway might have said, to see a honey bee stuck like glue--nature's "gorilla glue?"-in the reproductive chamber of a milkweed. It's...

A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is  the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee struggles to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee struggles to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee struggles to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Almost free! A honey bee works to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Almost free! A honey bee works to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Almost free! A honey bee works to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Death trap: This bee couldn't free herself from the sticky milkweed blossom of a Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Death trap: This bee couldn't free herself from the sticky milkweed blossom of a Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Death trap: This bee couldn't free herself from the sticky milkweed blossom of a Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 17, 2020 at 12:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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