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Searching the California Floristic Province for Trapdoor Spiders

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

A UC Davis scientist has just received a federal grant to study trapdoor spiders in California, with opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in the research....

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)
A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

A trapdoor spider, Aptostichus sp., one of the species that Jason Bond studies. (Photo by Jason Bond)

WSU Video with UC Davis Connections: Selecting Methods for Honey Bee Breeding

Bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of WSU, former of UC Davis, with a frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're a beekeeper or scientist and want to know more about bee breeding, you should access the newly produced video, "Selecting Methods for Honey Bee Breeding." It's the...

Bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of WSU, former of UC Davis, with a frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of WSU, former of UC Davis, with a frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of WSU, former of UC Davis, with a frame at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Harry H. Laidlaw Jr., (left) father of honey bee genetics, with graduate student and later colleague Robert E. Page Jr.
Harry H. Laidlaw Jr., (left) father of honey bee genetics, with graduate student and later colleague Robert E. Page Jr.

Harry H. Laidlaw Jr., (left) father of honey bee genetics, with graduate student and later colleague Robert E. Page Jr.

UC researcher is promoting healthy families in Tulare and Kings county communities

In a new series starting today, UC ANR features a sampling of our academics whose work exemplifies the public value UC ANR brings to California.

UC Cooperative Extension nutrition, family and consumer sciences advisor Deepa Srivastava arrived in the San Joaquin Valley in 2017 to conduct a research and education program that makes children and families healthier in Tulare and Kings counties.

Srivastava joined Cooperative Extension with diverse experience in obesity prevention research and program implementation and evaluation. Her job combines extension, research, university and public service to promote healthy living among families and children in low-income communities.

“I could hardly believe how well this job fit my interests, skills and education,” she said. “I have been involved in research and implementation and evaluation of nutrition education programs in the Department of Nutrition at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The UCCE position is ideal.”

UCCE nutrition, family and consumer sciences advisor Deepa Srivastava in front of one of the posters she presented at the California Childhood Obesity Conference.

Born in India, Srivastava immigrated to the United States after completing undergraduate and graduate degrees in her home state of Allahabad. She also earned a master's degree at North Dakota State University before moving to Nebraska, where she earned a Ph.D. in human sciences, with specialization in child, youth and family studies. After completing her doctorate degree at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Srivastava also worked as a project lead for the Ecological Approach to (EAT) Family Style project.

“My educational background and diverse experience prepared me to be a professional in the field of childhood obesity prevention and nutrition education,” Srivastava said.

Srivastava manages two federally funded nutrition programs for low income residents of Tulare and Kings counties. The CalFresh Healthy Living program presents information on food safety, food resource management, gardening, physical activity and youth engagement. Educators reach out to elementary schools to help develop school wellness policies and make lunchroom changes that steer children toward making nutritious food choices.

The second program, the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, presents a series of classes to low-income families at community centers, schools and other service centers. The classes help participants stretch their food dollars, select and prepare healthy foods and take part in physical activity.

To shape her research program in Tulare and Kings counties, Srivastava conducted a needs assessment study to understand nutrition practices in early childhood education settings. Tulare and Kings counties are among the counties in the state with high levels of obesity and food insecurity.

Following her needs assessment, Srivastava concluded a successful pilot focused on preschoolers in Kings County. She and her nutrition team in Kings County, in partnership with the Department of Hospitality Management at West Hills Community College-Lemoore and preschools located at the college campus, implemented a collaborative nutrition education program to help preschoolers learn about healthy eating.

Srivastava is conducting further research to assess program sustainability and community engagement efforts, including how nutrition education offered by UCCE in Tulare and Kings counties motivates children and families to improve their knowledge, attitude, skills and behavior. Her research aims to understand the influences on children's eating and physical activity practices.

Srivastava is actively involved in obesity prevention initiatives within UC ANR and at the local, statewide and national level. Working with local community partners, she and her team have already introduced a number of change initiatives in Tulare and Kings counties to promote healthy lifestyles across lifespan, such as establishing new school gardens, youth engagement projects, healthy youth farmer's market and physical activity such as walking clubs and dance exercise classes.

“Our team is supported by experts from the University of California who are on the cutting-edge of the latest research and curriculum design,” Srivastava said.

Srivastava and her team were recognized at the National Extension Association for Family & Consumer Sciences conference in Hershey, Penn., in October 2019, where they won two SNAP-Ed/EFNEP awards: third-place at the national level and first place for the Western region.

“I am proud of my team's passion and hard work,” she said. “Our nutrition education programs have meaningful private and public values that promote healthy people and communities.”

Posted on Monday, January 27, 2020 at 11:22 AM
Tags: Deepa Srivastava (1), nutrition (125), obesity (29)
Focus Area Tags: Food

Pieris rapae, Pieris rapae, Pieris rapae...

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Today dawned foggy," began Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, in a Jan. 22nd group email. As you know, Shapiro sponsors the annual Cabbage White...

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint last summer in Vacaville. (Too late in the season last year to win Art Shapiro's contest.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Troubling Question: Why Are the Monarchs Declining in the West?

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The question is troubling: What's going on with the monarch butterfly population in the West? The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation reported this week that its...

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from its host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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