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Come on In--the Pollen's Fine

A honey bee struggles to fit inside a strawberry blossom. In the bee world, one size fits all.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

She didn't know it was National Pollinator Week. If she had, she would have paid it no mind. She just knew that this was some fine pollen as she struggled to fit inside the...

A honey bee struggles to fit inside a strawberry blossom. In the bee world, one size fits all.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee struggles to fit inside a strawberry blossom. In the bee world, one size fits all.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee struggles to fit inside a strawberry blossom. In the bee world, one size fits all.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Berry berry fine, she pronounces. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Berry berry fine, she pronounces. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Berry berry fine, she pronounces. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee thrusts out her proboscis (tongue). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee thrusts out her proboscis (tongue). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee thrusts out her proboscis (tongue). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee stops to clean her tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee stops to clean her tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee stops to clean her tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Okay, back to foraging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Okay, back to foraging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Okay, back to foraging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, June 25, 2020 at 3:20 PM

Bug Love: How Much Do You Know About Insect Courtship and Intimacy?

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's all about insect courtship rituals and intimacy, or what entomologists sometimes call "insect wedding photography."  The Bay Area-based SaveNature.Org, a...

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) keeping busy on a Tithonia flower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) find one another on a foxglove. This image was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) find one another on a foxglove. This image was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) find one another on a foxglove. This image was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Birds do it. Bees do it. So do lady beetles, aka ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Birds do it. Bees do it. So do lady beetles, aka ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Birds do it. Bees do it. So do lady beetles, aka ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis, UC ANR Communicators Win Awards

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hats off to the communicators affiliated with the University of California, Davis, and the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) for their international...

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters reacts to her first encounter with a stick insect at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. This candid image won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feature story on UC Davis staff academic advisor Elvira Galvan Hack (pictured) won a silver award in the ACE competition. The article, by Kathy Keatley Garvey, traced her success story. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A feature story on UC Davis staff academic advisor Elvira Galvan Hack (pictured) won a silver award in the ACE competition. The article, by Kathy Keatley Garvey, traced her success story. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feature story on UC Davis staff academic advisor Elvira Galvan Hack (pictured) won a silver award in the ACE competition. The article, by Kathy Keatley Garvey, traced her success story. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Western IPM Center's Steve Elliott won a silver award for his piece on
Western IPM Center's Steve Elliott won a silver award for his piece on "IPM in Yellowstone."

Western IPM Center's Steve Elliott won a silver award for his piece on "IPM in Yellowstone."

Diane Nelson of the UC College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences won a bronze award for her piece on
Diane Nelson of the UC College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences won a bronze award for her piece on "Can Science Save Citrus?"

Diane Nelson of the UC College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences won a bronze award for her piece on "Can Science Save Citrus?"

Got Squash? Got Squash Bees?

What's pollinating the squash blossom? A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, a species of solitary bee in the tribue Eucerini. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Got squash blossoms? You've probably got squash bees. Unlike honey bees, which are generalists, squash bees are specialists. They pollinate only members of...

What's pollinating the squash blossom? A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, a species of solitary bee in the tribue Eucerini. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's pollinating the squash blossom? A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, a species of solitary bee in the tribue Eucerini. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's pollinating the squash blossom? A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, a species of solitary bee in the tribue Eucerini. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, foraging in a crooked- neck squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, foraging in a crooked- neck squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, foraging in a crooked- neck squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, dusted with pollen from the crooked-neck squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, dusted with pollen from the crooked-neck squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, dusted with pollen from the crooked-neck squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The fruit of their labors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The fruit of their labors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The fruit of their labors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 22, 2020 at 4:53 PM

The Achemon Sphinx Moth: A Lovely Beast, Indeed

Eumorpha achemon, the Achemon Sphinx, is a

It is indeed a “lovely beast,” as lepidopterist Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology,  says.  Ann Sievers,...

Eumorpha achemon, the Achemon Sphinx, is a
Eumorpha achemon, the Achemon Sphinx, is a "lovely beast," says UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro. Ann Sievers, owner, grower and miller Il Fiorello Olive Oil Co., recently found this one the wall of her patio. (Photo by Ann Sievers)

Eumorpha achemon, the Achemon Sphinx, is a "lovely beast," says UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro. Ann Sievers, owner, grower and miller Il Fiorello Olive Oil Co., recently found this one the wall of her patio. (Photo by Ann Sievers)

What's for lunch? A chicken in one of Ann Sievers' flocks at Il Fiorello Olive Oil Co., eyes the photographer. Chickens eagerly eat lots of bugs--if they're available. The larvae of the Achemon Sphinx moth feed on grape leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's for lunch? A chicken in one of Ann Sievers' flocks at Il Fiorello Olive Oil Co., eyes the photographer. Chickens eagerly eat lots of bugs--if they're available. The larvae of the Achemon Sphinx moth feed on grape leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's for lunch? A chicken in one of Ann Sievers' flocks at Il Fiorello Olive Oil Co., eyes the photographer. Chickens eagerly eat lots of bugs--if they're available. The larvae of the Achemon Sphinx moth feed on grape leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Naturalist-photographer Greg Kareofelas took this image of an Eumorpha achemon larva in his yard in Davis several years ago. It was feeding on native grape, Vitus californica. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
Naturalist-photographer Greg Kareofelas took this image of an Eumorpha achemon larva in his yard in Davis several years ago. It was feeding on native grape, Vitus californica. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Naturalist-photographer Greg Kareofelas took this image of an Eumorpha achemon larva in his yard in Davis several years ago. It was feeding on native grape, Vitus californica. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

An adult Eumorpha achemon, photographed by naturalist-photographer Greg Kareofelas in his yard in Davis several years ago. It was feeding on native grape, Vitus californica. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
An adult Eumorpha achemon, photographed by naturalist-photographer Greg Kareofelas in his yard in Davis several years ago. It was feeding on native grape, Vitus californica. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

An adult Eumorpha achemon, photographed by naturalist-photographer Greg Kareofelas in his yard in Davis several years ago. It was feeding on native grape, Vitus californica. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

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